About your Search

20121128
20121206
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37
've been a fish or a bird or a game species of some kind or a forest. when we think about the environment and our place and i come the species of concern became us. what we do to the environment and what we do to ourselves in the process. so i think when i looked back five decades in the rearview mirror, we can actually see the beginnings of this change in the way we think about the national world. michael rachel carson fault line come a tipping point between these two things. she had a strong presence in conservation movement, which i'll talk about in a moment and was really an affect the founder of the modern environmental movement. i think it's possible to actually point to a specific moment in time when that happened, when we began to think differently about the environment and our relation to it. it came in the late summer of 1962 about a month before rachel "silent spring" is an unpublished. in june of 1962 come at the yorker published three long excerpts. through the course of the summary huge controversy flared up around the book and people began to take sides on it and people beg
in a bill rate environment for the self amortization was happening very quickly because interest rates are low and on the other hand, we are in a place and time of property values were declining. this is a policy that might've made sense in 2000, but it doesn't make sense today. and having an office that can really dig into these kinds of information and make policy changes they somewhat were finding. so i'm not going to go into every action that were taking, but i hope what people see from this is we are continuing to be aggressive about taking action and ensuring we can put the phone in the best position possible while balancing the need to provide access to credit for would-be home buyers and healthy neighborhoods in the nation frankly keep this fragile housing recovery going. it's attending medical very much. [applause] >> thank you so much. that was a remarkably clear and informative presentation in a short time. we appreciate that. and now it's my pleasure to introduce our impressive panel. we'll go in order. roberto quercia misdirect her of the usc center for community capital w
in the marketplace of ideas. there's good reason for that. creature grew up in environments where we were always subject to threat. we're looking at that thing that is going to hurt us. we are no longer in the environment. we're in a complex economy the inner dependent that really relies on organizations to provide us with the necessities. so we have to update our thinking, and think longer term, focus on stories that actually represent trends, and not compage -- exaggerate noise. we have to get away from fear. fear played a role in the development of human societies in the earliest stages, it's encoded in the dna, but to evolve, to a sort of complex modern stliermt we live in, we have to update the most basic aspects, so that's what your question speaks to if. >> -- full venture capitalist? >> you know, the opposite of that might be say, well, venture capitalist has to be inherently optimistic, why would you invest in thing where there are uncertain returns and so forth. telling the story about "the coming prosperity." that's a story, you know, easily characterized. and i really don't see it th
something we can do about. it's how the thing we're doing to the environment are making these things more unbearable. for example, construction, you know, soon after the earthquake in haiti thereu was an earthqua in chile that killed on slightly same level or killed less than 100 people.at and ours ended up killing so many people. we are a city of badly constructed buildings and all of the things. people had been forced to leave the country side to come to the city to work. you had the den population.oce we often discuss these things and how the environment, howse erosion, how the land, how the fact that we have to burn ourn i trees forn charcoal causes us have the massive mudslides and flooding when a hurricane goest through. so these things, too, i thinka more of the things question do something about as a community. we that -- the other theory are also -- [inaudible] talked about.t >> in reading through "so spoke the earth: the haiti i knew, the haiti i know, the haiti i want to know" i was struck by the fact that so manyb writers yearn in a sense to return to haiti. >> i think so many
oil. that's where i want to get. i spent several years as chairman of the environment and public works committee and several years as the ranking member. all during that time people keep saying the one thing we all agree on is we need to be off of foreign oil. we need not to be dependent upon the middle east. and yet right now we know and no one is going to refute this fact, no one today, or in the future, that when we had the usgs report and the other reports saying that we now are in a different position than we've been before. we are not only -- we do not have only 2% as some people are saying, of the reserves in fossil fuels. i'm talking about coal, oil and gas. we are number one in the world now. we didn't used to be. two years ago we couldn't have said that. right now we are. we have the -- the opportunity and we can look at the opportunity in terms of our -- of our reserves that are usable of being totally self-sufficient. this is the thing so disturbing when people talk about they don't want to be dependent on the middle east therefore we have to spend billions of dollars of de
of the side of the house go to those victims, and our thanks go to the emergency services and the environment agency for the fantastic job that they do. let me also associate myself with his remark about the leveson report which we published tomorrow. i hope we can work on an all party bases. this is a once in a generation opportunity for real change. and i hope that this house can make it happen. mr. speaker, when the work program was launched in june 2011, the prime minister described it as, and i quote, the biggest and boldest program since the great depression. 18 months on, can the update the house on how it is going? >> yes icann. i can update out to over 800,000 people have taken part in the work program. over half came off benefits. over 200,000 people have gotten into work because of the work program. but i think it is worth remembering that the work program is dealing with the hardest to work cases there are in our country. these are people, adults have been out of work for over a year, and young people have been out of work for over nine months. on that basis yes, we need to make f
holding unpopular views. the author contends this environment has increased the country's political and decreased this course. it's about 45 minutes. [applause] thanks so much for having me. i was at that first conference and we had randy barnett speaking over there and was exciting to be here for the inauguration from the organization. i'm going to start on a little bit of a personal note. i'm having a big month and i want to let you know since some of your friends of mine and some of you will be. i just got married on the 12th. [applause] i have a book come out on tuesday called campus censorship and the end of the american debate and i am leaving right after this for my 20 it high school reunion took about how free speech is curtailed on the modern american campus and how i believe it harms us all whether we are on campus or not. why did i write this? i wrote "unlearning liberty" because i went to stanford specifically to study the first amendment. it's been a passion of mine my entire life. i believe it is in part i have a russian father and a british mother and i definitely cam
when it does. imagine classroom in a blended learning environment where rich digital content comes from the very best providers where teachers are managing the learning experience for students. where it's competency based. we don't sit our butt in the seat for 180 days and say it's time to take three months off and come back and sit our slighter bigger butts down for another 180 days. we move to a system where if you master the material you are not held back. if you haven't mastered the terrible you're not bushed along. the accountability to customize the learning experience in a powerful way is what technology offers. that requires changes of law. many states are embracing element of what is the digital learning revolution. in doing so, i think they will accelerate learning in ways that will create the gaps. we will see them begin to narrow and it will create real opportunity for continuous improvement and advancement. the final thing i'm going tell you talk to you about is about another book. that's the book being a texan by birth and floridian by choice. i have a little texas her tib
was trying to do, i believe, was set the agenda and create an environment so that he could win politically and set up after the quote, a rare weekend session in the senate where he had two votes, no republican amendments allowed, and he set this up to show that republicans were obstructionists, and that they would not go along with what he said was good for the country, and this was a public relations ploy designed to shift attention from the democrats inability to come along with what republicans wanted to do, which is fine, their prerogative k to republicans saying we don't want to go along with what the democratsment to do. in short, he was seeking to control the agenda, and i think that's the real issue here. certainly, there are times when minorities of both parties obstruct the majority because they need to or want to, but the real issue is one of agenda control. if you -- we actually have a way to think about this, you know, in political science, and, you know, norm knows more than i do, but look at house majority parties, hey, that tells us a lot how they behave today. they try to
this time rather than the upside, which is going to require hard political choices in an environment as is emphasized in the first panel, were making those choices is much more difficult for our political representatives. >> michael, those are very good with it and not. we are faced with hard choices, a political environment overcome a by leadership is harder today than it was a four. i want to thank you all for coming. we will be doing more of these as part of our oral history project in the future. we should all think the panelists together. [applause] >> looking at very aspects, dealing with the so-called fiscal cliff and today we're going to turn our attention to expiring tax credits that could families and businesses adjoining the sort that discussion is stephen sloan, to start with, could you define frat a tax credit is and how that differs from a taxom deduction? >> guest: post-credits and deductions are used to lower somebody's tax bill. they credit lower somebody's tax bill dollar for dollar. if you say you have the $1000 tax credit come your tax lowere, -- basically a reduc
then baked circe wells while also enhancing the environment. although the project on our coast of their job, they were weakened or in the storm not require repairs so were not for mobility future storms. unfortunately the northeast mid-atlantic received more frequent and larger storms like standing in the future. the 70 to find cost-effective ways to ensure projects will continue to protect lives and property. we also need to look into whether adaptive measures. wetlands, oyster beds and sea grass that are cost and can be sustained for years to come. but can also get better results for less money if we allow states more flexibility in managing different sources along the shoreline is a complete set of the system instead as an individual project. this strategy is called regional government man to rent this one that deserves more attention. madam chair and colleagues, i think you've concluded your draft of water resources bill in which i appreciate and i hope we can address that later this year. unfortunately, other areas where this will protect it and saw. this first photo -- this is a new b
environment. i'm not saying that they are more welcoming to media attention, but they came of age in a world where they -- remember, look, justice scalia has written a book, justice thomas has written a book, justice breyer. william o. douglas, justice sonia sotomayor is writing a book. i think it's great when they go out in public and write books and talk about it and become a little more accessible. >> it's funny about "the brethren" because the law clerks born before "the brethren" feel that byron white's relationship with this clerks changed bought he was furious about the leaks, determined to figure out who leaked and the clerks think something changed and the rules in the chambers and conversations with the justices, et cetera. i don't knee whether the justice -- all their attitudes have changed but when you look at newspaper articles that were written at the time to disclose chambers, written by eddie has lazarus, and sure surrogates who were saying this young man should be tarred and feathered, and scalia said if any of his law clerks did that, he would hunt them down. i think some w
having an impact on our environment. we had major problems on our shorelines and we need to take a look at shoreline restoration and other issues. we need to be prepared to deal with those issues. as the chairman pointed out we need to deal with the funding of storm infrastructure. you are right, our first obligation is to make sure people who are affected and communities that are affected we do what we can to bring them back where they need to be. we also need to deal with public safety issues because these events will be occurring more frequently in the future. invested -- the beaches have been replenished. it acts as a natural storm break to ocean city in which there are lots of people who live, have homes, etc.. it worked. it prevented a lot more damage that would otherwise have occurred. it is an investment. we make those investments to save lives and property and it did work. i will be coming back to tell you we need to invest and common-sense ways we can deal with the realities, we also need water resources development act, a water bill, you had a hearing on that. we need to move
radiance see. they on this and a professional environment. they have this eight (...) this you can use, you charge this. your aunt and off button is on top. --on and off button is on top. deep. this is the technology, believe it or not this is a tiny tip with the thermodynamic wire is gently slide this or get in the same motion as if you put a razor over your arms. you barely feel anything and the surface here is crystallizing. you can cut off the surface hair. and watch this the difference with this no! no! is what is happening and beneath the that blue light is the thermodynamic wire we do not know how our hair grows and cycles this whenever you need to. you can consistently get your hair in the cycles. >>guest: you'll will expect more resultbetter results. picture, this stubble on your and this after it is from just using this for a few weeks. you can use this lasts and lasts. the more you use this the less you need to. and then you can let the care regrow hebronhair regrow. [reading] >>host: please understand what jennifer crawford is saying. in your bottom little13 the used no! no!
] in some of those difficult -- and one of the most difficult environments. lieutenant colonel vowell ripeness at stanford university doing his work college fellowship. [inaudible] >> cooperation spent all right. center for international security and cooperation. want to get your stanford bosses to let you come out here today. very, very happy. he's working on a thesis right now on afghanistan after 2014. but, of course, i got to know him while he was deployed in afghanistan, and got to visit his battalion. first, while he was out where we met, joe holiday at the time the no slack, and now the study of war, then again in february of 2011 at a commanders conference held by the colonel who was the commander of task force, second brigade -- first brigade. first brigade of the 101st responsible for all of kunar province. i'm never going to live that down. but we are absolutely thrilled to have you here to talk to us about not only a different echelon. so if you can all welcome for me lieutenant colonel j. b. vowell who will soon take command of task force, well, of the third brigade of th
feel good, or do you gain ground in a competitive environment against china? >> we absolutely gain ground. i want to see, we have real strengths in america. with strengths in the things all the other countries die for. hire education, entrepreneurial climate, a lot of science and technology, enormous dynamism in this country and a lot of strengths. but what we've done is we allowed a bunch of unnecessary costs of doing business to grow up and creep up. by in action basically. at the same time as all these other countries, and, of course, i work around the world on this topic, all the other countries have whole task forces of national leaders that work every day to drive down the cost of doing business and make the infrastructure better and make better airports and make better data communications, and make it simpler to do business. so what's happened is we've taken for granted, we have these great strengths can look at us, we're wonderful. we've not been able to make progress. we're not talking about hard stuff. talking about keeping our infrastructure modern. we are talking about
then. as bill and tom pointed out, the political and media environments are much more hazard use today than they were then for all the reasons they have laid out. as bill and many others have pointed out, the sequestration sword that was hanging over the nation in 1990 was much more serious. it was three times more than three times as great as the sequestration percentage cuts that we are looking at on january 2nd. third, the initial bush budget for the fiscal year 1991, was based on quite unrealistic economic assumptions and failed to include anywhere near enough money for the savings and loan bailout, the rtc, and others all the became revealed during the spring of 1990. the economy was beginning to falter during the spring, and interest rates were rising. it's interesting to think about that a little. right now federal reserve policy basically has insulated us from one of the major consequences of fiscal irresponsibility. interest rates began to rise people in the housing industry, people selling durable consumer goods, stuff bought on credit immediately begin to -- right now we hav
policy that works for the economy as well as the environment going forward. >> we may not have emphasized that but we will have a discussion in the report about how to go forward in that area also. >> quote when we have you got a strategy now for approaching the congressional leadership in the recommendations to make them recognize that it is a high priority? >> we are going to be working on that and we are committed to talking about what we are recommending and taking it to the administration we obviously have members of the board that have contact and access to the administration. i have already discussed this with a number of the members in the senate in particular, lisa murkowski who would be the chairman and ranking in the energy committee and others that are going to be players in this area. so when we get the final product, we are going to take it to the administration for their review and evaluation as they move forward on the energy will. >> we will not have worked on this together much. we are interested in an aggressive strategy that will reach out to the administration and con
for improvement and identifies the funding environments. amtrak ridership set a record last year as they indicated. and with an aging population higher gasoline prices and the total instability of the fuel resources, highway and aviation congestion, millions of more travelers choose to ride the train if the service is available and dependent. amtrak workers are prepared and well trained to provide services to our customers, but for us to succeed congress must provide amtrak with consistent and predictable multiyear funding for modernization and capacity upgrades. beyond reorganization, what amtrak really needs is dramatic increases in capital investments. amtrak's next generation plans for the northeast corner is outstanding. it will cut the transaction it time in half between washington and new york, as well as between new york and boston. they need to increase speed and updecorate the infrastructure is the ticket to transporting americans in an cost effective and energy efficient matter. we and labor are ak -- amtrak's partner. we -- if they so see the need but more importantly, the substantial
in the environment and tripping heavily over reputation low-risk. wells is a company with a culture of customer focus and restraint and td bank provides a simple lesson if you don't understand it, don't invest in it. each of these terms applied strong governance, good management, operational confidence and discipline but with different approaches. some of these firms had serious problems since the crisis and jpmorgan chase actually lost billions of dollars in their london office in an event that reveals poor risk-management. the point here is these terms have successful strategies for weathering the crisis. there's a difference between taking a large loss such as jpmorgan recently took and having the company failed. the companies that failed the crisis did not just take losses but went out of business, required massive amounts of taxpayer aid, ended their existence as independent companies. and successful firms included fannie mae and freddie mac, bear stearns, lehman, merrill lynch, citigroup, wachovia, ubs, aig, and wamu. with variations they exhibited similar shortcomings in organization, governan
and the same environment we are, speak the same language, these are choices and choices about how we run markets. the distribution of marketing, there is a lot you can do, it is choice about what you do after words as well, providing universal health coverage or provide decent support or an educational system that is well funded for everybody, not just people in the right neighborhoods. >> and the tax system is obviously important, not only for inequality opportunity, but also growth. so for instance if you have a tax system like ours where speculators are taxed at a different rate than if people who work for a living or from any into a bank account in the cayman islands rather than peak united states, you have extended the rules not only to give lower taxes, tax rates to those who avail themselves of these, but distorts the economy and you wind up with more speculation. the money isn't in the cayman islands because it grows better in the sunshine. lack of sunshine, is the reason people keep their money there. >> i had a conversation with someone from the financial industry trying to mak
on batteries. and that is money. this is better you and the environment. is not only better for mother earth but it saves money and last longer. shipping! flexpay in price only good for my show. we have 3000 of them. how quickly can you call? lori leland (...) >>guest: we sold out of the point and shoot oylmpus serveearlier so now we brought back the slr style, your favor. this is a great zoom to get you closer than ever before in the palm of your hand. this is 14 oz yet you get all the bells and whistles. a stunning 3 in. screen. one of olympus up. ' is the one-touch button 720 p hi-def video right here. shannon mentioned the beauty-mode and fix. i love the grip because you feel so stable and steady. when we start talking about 36 times optical-zoom we are going to get you closer than you thought you could ever get for this price point. friend is out here doing the paddle boarding. re all the way in at full 36 times. --getting closer. i could see the water bottle on the tip of the board. about with this ground- breaking lens your mind will be blown. these are the pictures we have become
groups, such as the global climate coalition, information council for the environment, heartland institute, annapolis center, and cooler heads coalition are created or enlisted to propagate this message of doubt. deniers question the motives and engage in harassment of the real credentialed climate scientists. well, for the record, there has been scientific debate regarding climate change. ideas have been tested, theories have been ventured, and the evidence keeps coming back to the same conclusion: increased carbon dioxide in the atmosphere from human-related sources is strengthening the greenhouse effect, adding to recent warming, and acidifying the oceans. actually, the evidence coming in tends to confirm the worst and most dangerous projections. mr. president, may i interrupt my remarks and ask unanimous consent that morning business be extended until 2:00 p.m. with senators permitted to speak therein for up to ten minutes each. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. whitehousemr. whitehouse: ak unanimous consent that that exchange be moved to the beginning or the end
. as far as the environment energy, it's an absolute winner. but we have to do it with the least amount of subsidy and god forbid there should be a prophet in operations that we could actually achieve that if we work together. so let's take the report together. first of all, the board of directors had organizational problems from very top of the board. i was very pleased for sitting this hearing and i ask questions before. we went to a nine-member board and seven members of the board had been appointed. two democrat appointees were lacking until yesterday the white house admitted these two and i'm pleased to see that and i hope everyone helps get the full complement of the board in place. sometimes it takes a hearing to get action under its implementation of a strategic plan for highlighting that the board should be filled. and maybe they did that at their own volition, but i'm very pleased that it was done. let's look at the key folks in place and you divided into six divisions. i'm very pleased to hear what she said about possibly not going forward with some of the commuter activities
. the challenge now is less military, the security environment is improving. it's now -- how doout yao get local governance in? get economic development so people have opportunities? just over the past year, if we had sat in this conference room a year ago and said, hey in december of 2013, sew mallways going to have a president, a constitution, parliament, al-shabab won't be in control of widespread areas across the country, we would all say, you're crazy. that's not going to happen, but that's exactly what did happen because the africans decided that's what they wanted to have happen. one little personal anecdote in that regard. i was afforded the great privilege, i believe, of last autumn, autumn of 2012 in a meeting in nairobi with the military chiefs of uganda and other countries. they had been directed by their heads of state, you guys figure out the military strategy to get -- defeat al-shabab in mogadishu first and then more broadly across the country. and they did just that. as you might suspect, wild disagreement how to do that. lots of different ideas of the right approach. ultimately
are not in a position to do things that we otherwise would be in a position to do in terms of shaping the environment to prevent war. so in my view, america's fiscal picture increases the risk of conflict around the globe. maybe not always involving the u.s., but certainly the risks are increasing globally based on our fiscal picture. the fifth point i would want to make is that the budget deal requires us to deal with a full deck of cards. and those people who keep wanting to take things off the table, in my view, are not being rational in terms of addition and subtraction. and when i say a full deck of cards, that includes defense participating in deficit reduction. this cannot be in the case of defense a sledgehammer approach. it's going to take a long runway dealing with these issues over time to give the defense department, and they can make, in my view, very significant changes in the budget, but do it in a way that does not damage our security. doing it abruptly as the fiscal cliff does or in a very compressed time frame is not only inefficient, i think it endangers our security and our risk.
of the vietnam war, it was the inaccessibility of my environment that made me feel the least welcome. i returned to a country not ready to receive me as a man who now used a wheelchair. that was the reality of an honors soldier would overcome -- the reality had to overcome until the united states improved laws to protect disabled. it is still a reality in many places overseas, places for a better at disabled citizens will likely travel in the future either for business or pleasure. we must ratify this treaty because protect the disabled and the united states of america and the right thing to do throughout the world. let me just again think senator kerry and senator lugar for their hard work on this treaty and we look forward to our colleagues voting for it in just a short hour from now. yield the floor. >> mr. president, how much time the reigns? >> 27 minutes remaining. >> and how much time -- >> about the same. >> mr. president camille for minutes, three minutes to the senator from delaware. >> thank you, mr. president. thank you word of foreign relations committee in your real leadership on t
:30 eastern. on c-span3, the senate environment and public works committee will hear about the impact of hurricane sandy from members of congress from areas hit by the storm. later the house oversight and government reform committee will hear on the government's response to the rising autism rate. that is also on c-span3 at 2:00 eastern. >> on 16 or 17 bases in the united states we have military runs. the average cost to educated child in that school is $50,000. almost four times what rest of public education costs. the vast majority used public schools. we could take the money we're spending today and pay every school system 14,000 per child and save billions of dollars per year and with the same or better outcomes. >> you can talk to oklahoma senator tom coburn about the fiscal cliff, the affordable care act and the future of the republican party on booktv's in death. the senator has written several books and reports including his latest, the debt bomb. join our three our conversation, your calls, e-mails, tweets, for senator tom coburn at noon eastern on booktv's in depth on c-span
time for us to put this body into a more -- even more partisan environment by doing so. and, again, i would commend the chairman and ranking member for what we're doing today because this is an example where -- how the senate can work and has worked on several bills in my short time here. but in other cases, you know, we have not been able to do that and i think that involves bot both -- both parties, again, working together to solve these problems. the issue before us on the fiscal cliff, i also wanted to address briefly if i could and that is with regard to the discussions ongoing about taxes and what we should do. and i just wanted to take this opportunity to talk a little about why some of us believe that raising tax rates would be counterproductive at a time when our economy is -- is so weak and there is another opportunity here and that's for tax reform. the jobs crisis and the debt crisis are linked and the president's made that pointed. he sai-- and the president's mat point. he said that his priority in the grand bargain discussions, the fiscal cliff discussions is to make su
editions. i have not yet heard these peepers complain of a press environment across the irish sea. of course, neither i nor anyone else any forms must be workable and proportionate. and if they are not, i will be the first to sound the alarm. in that event, we would then need to consider how to make progress. because the absolute worst outcome in all of this would be for nothing to happen at all. mr. speaker, we mustn't now delay. like many people, i am impatient for reform. luckily, nothing i have seen so far in this debate suggests to me that we will find a better solution than the one which has been proposed. nor do i draw any hope from the repeated failure of peer self-regulation that we have seen over the last years. we need to get on with this without delay. we owe it to the victims of these scandals who have already waited too long for us to do the right thing. i am determined that we should not make them wait anymore. i commend this to the house. >> thank you, mr. speaker. can i think the deputy prime minister for his excellent statement. as the deputy prime minister has s
, it was the inaccessibility of my environment that made me feel the least welcome. i returned to a country not ready to receive me as a man who now used a wheelchair." that was the reality of an honored soldier who had overcome -- it was the reality that an honored soldier had to overcome until the united states improved its laws to protect the disabled, and it is still a reality in many places overseas, places where our veterans and other disabled citizens will likely travel in the future. either for business or pleasure. we must ratify this treaty because protecting the rights of the disabled is the right thing to do in the united states of america, and it's the right thing to do throughout the world. and let me just again thank senator kerry and senator lugar for their hard work on this treaty, and we look forward to our colleagues voting for it in just a short hour from now. i yield the floor. mr. kerry: mr. president, how much time remains? the presiding officer: we have 27 minutes remaining. mr. kerry: how much time on the opponents? the presiding officer: about the same. mr. kerry: mr. presid
, the prices paid by the american people and your businesses. economic environment worldwide. we should not accept john engler, he and i philosophically don't agree on much. i'm just being honest. but john is exactly right when he says the only thing that's good for us to destroy your credit rating. so i can send a very clear message to people here. we are not going to play that game. if congress in any way suggest that they're going to try negotiations, tickets to the brink of default once again is part of a budget negotiation, which by the way we have never done in our history and so we did it last year. i will not play that game. because we've got to break that habit before it starts. >> see the full remarks tonight at 9:00 p.m. eastern on our companion network on the c-span. >> early in primetime, kristen holland and tennessee republican senator bob corker discussed the january fiscal deadline at an event hosted by bloomberg government and deloitte consulting. see that at 8:00 p.m. eastern on c-span. >> we have had these explosions of knowledge in medicine, but we have not coordinat
gentlemen have led admirably in a very difficult environment. this amendment does what i think we need to do next, to put before the senate in an appropriate classified setting useful information about the possibilities before us and before our allies in a very difficult, very complex region that is, as senator paul has noted, currently undergoing dramatic conflict. let me speak to a few points that persuaded me to join senator mccain and senator levin in cosponsoring this amendment. first despite the comments from my colleague from kentucky, these plans will be delivered to the senate in classified form. they will not be accessible to the general public. they will not be broadcast to our opponents or those who might seek to learn about america's plans. they will only be delivered in classified form. second, and i think most importantly, it is explicit in this amendment that nothing in this section shall be construed as a declaration of war or an authorization for the use of force. senator paul's offer brings up concerns that we are rushing headlong into overengagement in a civil war best le
developed when they are submitted with the purpose of keeping our commitments to our environments and keep our commitments to them, once they return home if they suffer from the wounds of war, both seen and unseen. so, madam president, i ask -- would ask the support of my colleagues for this important amendment and i would ask for the yeas and nays. madam president, i would call up -- ask unanimous consent to set aside all pending amendments and call up cornyn amendment 3158. the presiding officer: without objection. the clerk will report. the clerk: the senator from texas, mr. cornyn, proposes an amendment numbered 3158. mr. cornyn: and i would ask unanimous consent to dispense with further reading of the amendment. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. cornyn: and now, madam president, i would ask for the yeas and nays. the presiding officer: is there a sufficient second? there appears to be. the yeas and nays are ordered. mr. cornyn: thank you, madam president. i yield the floor. a senator: i suggest the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. q
isn't necessarily prologue. we have many differences in the political environment and when i first came to congress they are polarized than they've been in many decades and there are some macrotrends that make this emphasized that it would be divided even deeper. first of all, the difference is the parties today are what we say in political ideologically sort. so the national journal the last to congress liberal republican is more conservative than those democrats but they've been in partisan terms. by the way olympia snowe, the gap it's even wider. in the house we have the most conservative democrats in the house according to the national bureau of voting figures come and some of the more liberal republicans are leaving the house and then it divided its even keepers of the parties are ideological but complementing that obviously reinforcing that division are three of the major factors that didn't exist back in the 1980's. first of all the way the congressional districts are drawn with the voting rights act with the computer models today most of the districts in the house are pre-d
of the nfl, the players association and pro-football and the industry in general and creating an environment that is productive? aspen begin to address these questions at the aspen ideas festival in june where we convened a panel called head games, can foot all save itself from itself and jim brown, the nfl legendary, the legendary nfl running back was on the panel and dan garza, professor at stanford who has worked on mouthguard technology that can measure the force of impacts on the head and kevin turner who was the subject of documentary which you will see a clip of it called american man produced by a colleague of mine who works at hbo. so, this panel will be featured in a show on the world channel on november 20 at 8:00 p.m. and on line as well. pbs is working with, public television is working with the aspen institute to turn this into a one-hour session. there will be a whole one-hour session which will include conversations about football safety but we are going to play about a ten-minute clip of that. [no audio] [inaudible conversations] let's come back to it. sorry about that. so w
on energy and environment and education that the president had a vision for where america needs to be in this new century where we've got rising competition in china and germany and india and if we're going to have an american century we cannot come in second place to those countries in technology of the future. and i think that played an important role. there was a sense that the obama vision was one that they thought better suited this moment in our country's history. and there is no question on social issues whether it's women's healthcare or immigration. there was asset of issues that for younger voters was important to think about the kind of country and kind of president they wanted representing them. so on all those questions people wrestled carefully. i think that's why ultimately enough people in enough battleground states chose the president to continue this journey we're on. quickly in terms of demoggrafi. we don't know this for sure but we could be seeing different elections in on years and off years. the election in 2014 is going to be different than presidential le
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37